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Isaiah Richardson
Isaiah Richardson

Commander In Chief Pc Game Torrent



GOG version for game Pathfinder Wrath of the Righteous, is a role-playing game with action elements, as well as with a fantasy style. Plunge into an amazing world filled with demons. Find out what the real nature of the forces of good and evil is, and get to the bottom of the true value of power, in order to eventually assume the role of a Mythical hero, capable of great accomplishments that exceed the expectations of all living creatures. Your path leads to an open portal to the Abyss, from which all-consuming evil oozes into the territory of this world. For more than a century, neighboring states tried to contain the threat, but all their attempts ended in failure.Now is the time for you to try your luck and end this conflict for good. Stand at the head of your army and challenge the fierce and powerful commander-in-chief of the demon army. Create your protagonist at the start of your long journey. Choose one of twenty-five classes and one race from the twelve presented. In the course of the passage, you can learn more than a thousand unique spells, pump a lot of skills and abilities, as well as work out your own style of play.




Commander In Chief Pc Game Torrent



BIG KATE AND THEWRITTENI FOR THE EVENING(Copyright, 1904, bjIt was only a cheap downtown restaurant,reeking with the odors of cabbage, onionsand boiled dinners. The cashier's desk hailed from a second-hand auction house; butthe girl behind it had :he air of a duchessextending her hand to be kissed.When the red-faced proprietor scoldedher she listened indiferenatly, or with theslightest upward curl of her lip, and whenhe tried to be jocose or to make love, hermanner was just the sme. Many times hehad threatened to discharge her, or tomarry her off-hand; but before her superbly indifferent eyes the words had died in histhroat, and lie had apologized and scowledand grumbled in the same breath. She wasgood at figures, was absolutely trustworthy,was a magnet for t.ade; and those attributes were valuable to a man who couldneither read nor comoine figures himself.Besides his hold upon her father was sufficient to make her mt-ry him whenever hewished. So whatever was his determinationIn secret, in her presen-e he quailed andwaited.In the cashier's desk was a book onetiquette, which bor, the marks of muchstudy, and with it were several novels ofthe old-school tyie, wherein the heroineswere proudly indifferent or sentimentallysilly. These books had melded the aestheticside of Big Kat's litf-. as had her determined attend-ince at niglit schools and persistent working at 'jobs" made up the practiSuitors Big Kate hid had in plenty,though her home life vs in a cellar, withthe perpetual steam o 1er mother's washtubs and 'the smoke ef her father's pipestifling the atmosphere. and with the scolding of th one and the uttt r shiftlessness ofthe other stirring her to early and abnormal activi*y.Big Kate's beauty w.-s of an unusual andstately type for suh (ivironment, and hervery indifference mide her seem more desirable. To not one of her suitors had sheshown kindnss however, and least of allto Red Pete, the resaurant owner. It wasan open secret that Mer father had promised her in return fir ualimited and perpetual whisky. The giil herself was awareof the promise.As customers came in her eyes gave thema single glance, anl if by rare chance oneof them was of the world described in novels, her eyes followed him down the restaurunt to one of the 0i;1(oth covered tables,and watched him moro oi less attentivelythrough the meal. Vut unfortunately herlesight into high life through these channels was not very satisftctory, for suchblack sheep as entere'l the restaurant wereusually much dish(-veled and battered bytheir hard fall. Big Kate's eyes were quickto note this. for she was shrewd, even inher ambition; and once noted, her superblyindifferent glance went back to the cursorysurvey of the more common run of customers. In her steret heart-her aestheticheart-she had deterined to marry a hero,if she ever married at all-not a back-alleyfighting hero, but one of the novel class, aman who had never smelled soapsuds andboiling cabbage in all nis life, and who hadleen able to ride in carriages withoutthought of expense.A few such men had come into the restaurant in tne two years, but the ones sheapproved of had scarcely noticed her, whilethose who paused at the desk with bold admiration had been s-nt on their way by asingle inquiring glance of her cold eyes.Then one day came a man who challenged her attention at the very door-he wasso big and strong and friendly looking. Buthis trousers were thrust negligently intolong. unblacked boots, and he wore a widebrimmed hat which flapped as he walked.and there was a big belt about his waist anda bright handkerchief knotted carelesslyabout his throat. As her eyes took in thesedamaging facts thty ieturned to the bookA LEC4ess*;"LOOK A-HERE, WE DONWTof etiquette which lay open among her business-like piles of coins.But a moment later out of the corner ofher eyes she saw something that madethem lift again and look straight down therestaurant. Two young girls were seatedat one of the tables, and a flashily dressedyouth had taken a chair and pushed it direc tly between them, to their evident annoyance. The newcomer's comprehensiveglance seemed to take In everything in theroom, this situation among the rest. Ashe passed the girls one hand removed thebroad-brimmed hat, while the other dropped upon the youth's shoulder and liftedhim with a strong, easy motion high Intothe air. In that position the youth wascnrried two tables down and dropped intoanother chair, with the remark, plainly audIble through the room:'There, sonny, that's the chair ye oughtto have took. Now, don't get flustered andcry, but eat your mush and molasses like anice little boy should, and then run out andplay. I'll take this next chair, and we'll bea little family sociable, you an' me."Involuntarily Big Kate smiled her warmapproval of the act; and the stranger,whose glance was again roving about theroom, caught the smile direct. Instantlyhe rose to his feet and came straight toher, his face full of responsive interest."Thank you for that smile, miss." hesaid, frankly. "It's the first reel friendlylook I've had since I left Texas. This cityseems to be mostly on a stampede, withnobody to round up. Don't it seem thatIden t know." she answered, vaguely,"I've never thought .about It that way,Buti, then, you see r'e never been out ofthe city In my life,""Nlever been out the city'" La ==e===e==.MAK FROM TEA&STAR BY FRANK 3. WEET.Frank H. Sweet.)"Good Lord! An' I've never been in on1like this before. Say, what do folks dhere for amusement-grass-fed countrfolks, I mean? You see, I only come 1last night with a bunch of cattle, an' I'vgot to stay here a whole week to round uthe sale. What'll I do evenin's an' offtimes?""Why, there is the bridge," d6ubtfully"and trolley rides. Strangers do them,believe. Then there are the theaters.""That's so," with jubilant relief in hivoice. "I've heard 'bout the New York theaters. Of course, I must see them. BtI'm 'feared I'll be like the bull in the chinshop that I've read of if I try to do ththing alone. I don't s'pose you'd bebe willin' to sort of start me this firevenin'? Ye see, I've never been in a theayter in all my life. Of course, I know Iain't the real proper way," hurriedly"there should be introducin's an' time tgit acquainted an' all that; but I donknow a single man in all New York. Dowto Texas we don't stand much on ceremony, like you do in a city; but I coulput up a stake or-or a margin with a pcliceman or somebody to show I measquare an' am well heeled. Will you go?Big Kate considered. At first her eyehad returned to her book of etiquette; therafter a little, had gone up to the franiboyish face looking down at her. It was aopen, manly face, with straight, honeseyes. She felt that intuitively. As to ceremony, that did not trouble her any morthan it did him. Besides, she owed himsomething for that act at the table."Yes, I will be glad to go," she answered"You may call for me a little before eightat-" she was about to say "the restatrant," but substituted instead, with a direclook at him, "the cellar below the Chineslaundry on the corner. My people live incellar."The next morning the Texan came Intthe restaurant for his breakfast, and stopped at the cashier's desk longer than w&necessary on his way out. And the same adinner and at supper. The last time he remained long enough at the desk to obtaliBig Kate's consent to go with him agalito the theater.The third evening, when he stopped at thdesk with his supper check, Red Pete appeared."Look here, Mister Cowboy," he blustered, "we don't want any more o' thisI'm willin' for the men to talk with BiKate, for it draws trade; but it musn't gtoo far. I don't want any more theategoin'. She's my promised wife."The Texan flashed a quick look at thcashier. She smiled calmly."It's the old man's promise, Red Pete,she said, serenely, "not mine. Yes," to thTexan, "I'll go with you. I thought the eellar would make some difference. I'm glait don't."Red Pete broke into a torrent of oathsstamping his feet."If he does go with you, it'll be clubs fohim. I've got good friends on the street."When he went out, the Texan sawpoliceman a few doors away. Obeyingsudden impulse, he went to him. This waunfamiliar ground to him, and it might bwell to play the game shrewdly."Hello, pardner," he began, affab1l"Reckon ye've got a toler'ble broken rangon this street. Plenty stampedin' anbuckin', ain't they?""It's a little rough, if that's what yoXmean," replied the officer, doubtfully."I s'posed so from the way things bolWell, if ye ever want quiet come down tTexas, and if ye ever come near the XX3ranch ask for Many Horse Charlie-that'me. I'll put the world up to ye righ1Money's easy down there. Here, drop thiinto your pocket," transferring a notthat made the officer's eyes glisten. "don't reckon the city pays more'n halwhat you earn, an' it's a duty for the people to make up the rest. Well, so long."The officer's eyes followed him gratefully."That's a gentleman," he soliloquizedWAAYfOEOTI.fredI hoeIabenr.The next day was a busy one, for thTexan was closing out the last of hiherd, and the deal would take him unt:late in the evening. But he found tim'for a few minutes' run into the restasrant,"I won't be able to git 'round for ththeater tonight, Katie," he maid as Itleaned over the desk; "but it won't malter so much now, after what we talk.over last night. It seems a good dealr that to keep it alive. The whole schemef'or its perpetuation has been worked outto the slightest detail. Every man andwoman in it knows his or her work andjust what to do in this or that emergency.When a member is promoted he does notand cannot set about revolutionizing hisdepartment; he can only bring novelty tothe position. The entire army is like awell-oiled machine, with each part doingits own particular duty. It can be leftin charge of lieutenants for an indefiniteperiod, if need be. I lately returned froma two months trip to Europe to find thatthe army in America had run along assmoothly during that time as if I had beenhere. I hardly ever visit or personallydirect the work of any of our social institutions, yet they are getting along swimmingly. What is true of America is equallytrue of the army in the various countries."I was in India ten years, leaving therefourteen years 'ago. Up to that time Iprobably understood the Indian work betterthan any other member of the army. Yetsuch is the army's organization that thework there has gone on without a hitch;indeed, the Indian army during my absencehas increased materially in numbers andpower. In other words, the Salvation Armynow runs on its own feet everywhere, ands not dependent on any one man to keepit erect and sturdy of l1imb.jme Management."The general has worked in numerousways that this might be brought about.The army in each country has its ownboard of trustees, who are solely responsible for the financial condition of the armytherein, and are subject to the laws of thecountry respecting incorporated bodies. Thearmy in America is incorporated under thelaws of the state of New York. The secretary of state must hpve a yearly accounting of the army's business, and permissionmust first be obtained-of the supreme courtto sell or mortgage any property whatsoever, The trustees paSa on the expenditureof any sum of money above $500, and ageneral finance board on sums less than thisamount. I could not get a piece of blotting per without the 'finAnce board's 'O.K', you see, the, financial side of thearmy is am carefully 0rp.ise5d as that of abig railroad, and it tend., every bit as muchto develop financial acumen. Indeed, thearmy has any numb of tip-top businessmen. There is one , the elbow of everycommissioner. He is known officially am achief secretary, and it is largely due to mychief secretary-Colonel Higgins-that theretyof the army in ,America in theegtand a half years has increasedin value from 4a,0 to $,2,0. In thelast two and a half Ped*'s eighty-six properties, valued at $85,000, have heem added.*What is true of Asserc8, on the financialside holds good elsewhr. Says air JohnRigby, lord justlee of appeal in E=gland:"'I have had no small insight duringsome years into the weightier 'ntters eonnected with the government and policy ofthe Salvation Army (In England), In allthat I have .en of the condtaqt' of the vastaffairs undertenko by them they baye, inmy judgment, shown not only seal but alsoa sober and steady determination to adaminister their fuds an a strictly legal andbuzsines-ige m..aner,"There need he no fear that thle BalvatonArmy will go to pbepes $or lack of a n,a.cier when it has so sean alMeady takingod -ar of its tsad"Niter ae we who now the bes-aere elt the -eeartheonFFICEBS, SOUTHERN INDIA.the Presbyterian Church of America iLlikely to be disbanded as a general organization because at the next general assembl,a new moderator will be elected. ThPresbyterian Church exists as a whole toa set of religious principles, and not because of any one man. So with the Salvation Army; and we love its principle so we]and revere our leader so highly for vitalizing it for us that we are not going to hindeits progress by neglecting to work for itadvancement as one great homogeneouibody. We realize that every army mushave a directing hand. Two army corpworking independently of each other,. yefor the same object, may never attain Itthere is no concertei action. The SalvatioiArmy is made up of many corps-one ieach of the countries in which it is represented. Its fight is for the betterment othe lowly poor throughout the world. Tibattle successfully it must, therefore, haVa supreme commander. This fact Is fullrealized by the army everywhere. Elsowhat could have hindered the secession 0the army in America, say, years ago? Foithe army here, as elsewhere, runs on itiown feet, and is distinct and separatbfrom the rest of the army in all things except in so far as its movements are directeby the general, assisted by the internationastaff.Expands His Staff."The army, by reason of this international staff and its various commissionersis assured for years to come of a generawho understands its work throughout thoworld; and a general so equipped will al.ways be necessary. Gen. Booth has neveldeviated from the policy of expanding hillieutenants. He has sent them from country to country and around tct world man3times that they might be broadened generally and specifically as regards the armyHe has been particularly insistent on interchange of nationalities. A Frenchmarhas command of the army In Holland. A4Dutchman is chief secretary in SwitzerlandCommissioner Elwyn Oliphant, in charge iTGermany, formerly commanded in Hollantand in Sweden, was in charge of our training college in London, speaks French, German and Swedish with equal facility, anhas a wife who is Dutch. If he were calle4to be general he would not be without extensive and varied knowledge of the army."But he is not the only officer who haghad wide experience: there are many otheriwho have also been in training for twent3years or more. Commissioner Thomas BCoombs, now in Great Britain, has commanded in Canada and Australia. ThomagMcKie, commissioner in Australia, wagformerly In Germany, and has been arounithe world twice on revival tours. Commissioner Booth-Hellberg of Switzerland hatcommanded in France and speaks four languages. The international staff is composed of men who have seen service in alparts of the world, and who are now irtouch with the army everywhere. This Ijparticularly true of Bramwell Booth, thogeneral's eldest son, who is chief of thistaff.Regularly Shifted."Indeed, every member of the army iliable to be shifted about, and thousand:are shifted yearly, so that the broadeniniprocess is going on constantly throughouthe whole organization, and material fQipossible future commissioners and generaliis continually in the making."With equal deliberation and foresighted.ness the plan whereby we secure a nevgeneral whenever the occasion arises waglong worked out after conferences wittsuch distinguished men as Gladstone, whos4advice was sought in the matter."Briefly, a general is given the power te wsigee it has come to understand usproof of the world's opinion of the atmny."But the work we have a


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